Tagged: Whistler

Whistler resident made it to Mars One’s next round, is one of 100 hopefuls

Reported by Natasha Chang, Mel Edgar, James Goldie and Deanna Cheng


Students in Mount Currie, B.C., had an out-of-this-world assembly Monday morning—their teacher, Joanna Hindle, could be jetting off on a mission to the red planet.

Hindle is currently a teaching English at Xit’olacw Community School at the Lil’wat Nation in Mount Currie. The brainchild of Dr. Norbert Kraft, Mars One aims to put a permanent human settlement on Mars by 2025. Hindle has made it to the third round of screening to be part of the Mars One.

She’ll be 52 by the time she gets to Mars, if she’s successfully chosen for Mars One. “My interest in our galaxy has stemmed from more romantic places, like Wordsworth’s description of the ruddy crest of Mars,” she said in her self-introduction video.

According to Hindle, her personality is a fit for this one-way Mars mission because she never gets bored. “I’m going to bring all the books with me, not in paper of course. I think we’re going to be a little tight on space.”

There are several big reasons why Hindle said she wants to go to Mars: “The opportunity to learn is unequaled, the refusal to adhere to the boundaries we create for ourselves in our cultures and our societies, the imaginative minds that are ignoring those boundaries and to celebrate humanity’s willingness to go and adventure.”

Continue reading

Hello Langara! Hello journalism! Hello New Westminster!

SAM TO photo

This is how I look on a good day. You may or may not see me wandering around New Westminster with a notebook and pen.

Hello. I mentioned previously, as part of my journalism program, I will be covering a municipal beat. This term, I’ll be reporting on New Westminster, doing my best to capture the flavour of this area. If you have any ideas, don’t be afraid to throw them at me.

Sharing a little bit about me: back to school and back on track.

The main highlight of my summer was completing Tough Mudder in Whistler with a few friends but otherwise, I spent majority of time working at a grocery store.

Tough Mudder wasn’t as tough as I thought it would be but there was one moment where my spirit quivered because I was required to jump off a platform that stood about 20 feet in the air into roughly 12 feet of cold, murky water. It was already too late when the volunteer said, “Don’t look down. Just look straight at the mountains in front and jump.” I had looked and took two steps back.

My mind blanked out a little bit from the moment my feet left that platform to the moment they hit the water. Ask me what happened and I cannot tell you. Heights are not easy.

There were a few other things I did this summer:

Reading “Journalism and Truth” put me through a roller-coaster ride. It started off with chapters that questioned the quality of sources journalists used, the stance on checkbook journalism and the reliability of eyewitness testimonies.

For a few days, I asked myself, “What am I doing this for? What is the point?”

However, by the end of the book, it saves itself. It reminds me why.

But journalism is still, as Thomas Griffith characterized it half a century ago in The Waist-high Culture, “history on the run.” Journalists need to be much more aware of their relative strengths and shortcomings, and they need to let the readers and viewers in on their secrets. After all, as Griffith remarked: “If journalism is sometimes inaccurate and often inadequate, ignorance would not be preferable.” (page 167)

With this reminder, I will cover everything as accurately as possible by deadline.

Thank you for your patience with me.

Deanna Cheng